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Medical Marijuana and Thyroiditis

What Is Thyroiditis?

Thyroiditis is simply inflammation of the thyroid. It has several different causes and forms. As a result, there are also a number of different treatments and expectations for thyroiditis. It could resolve easily and without complication or the opposite. The thyroid is located at the front of the neck, but thyroiditis symptoms may not be limited to this area. That is because the thyroid is part of the endocrine system. When caused by another thyroid condition or when serious, thyroiditis can affect the body in various ways.
Thyroiditis can be caused by infections and viral illnesses. It can also be found in people with immune and autoimmune disorders. Certain women may experience thyroiditis after giving birth. Some medications are also known to cause thyroiditis. There are instances when there is no detectable underlying cause for thyroiditis. Anyone can develop this condition without warning. Thyroiditis may result in hypothyroidism, even long after the inflammation is cleared up, sometimes years after.
In some cases, thyroiditis does not present with pain. In other cases, there is pain and noticeable swelling around the thyroid gland. The gland may swell and/or hurt on one or both sides. In painful cases, the pain can radiate up to the mouth and ears. Other symptoms include excessive sweating, difficulty swallowing, tachycardia, fatigue, bradycardia, dry skin, cold skin, lack of appetite, constipation and low grade fever.
Treatment of thyroiditis typically means combating the inflammation and the thyroid malfunctions that can arise. This means hormone therapy and anti-inflammatory medication. Fevers, heart rate changes and pain may also be treated. Sometimes surgery is indicated, but that is not the norm. Medical marijuana research indicates that it can treat inflammation, lack of appetite and pain. There is some risk involving patients with rapid heart rates, as marijuana can increase one's heart rate. Only a doctor can decide what type of medical marijuana is the safest for an individual thyroiditis sufferer. The cause, symptoms and complications will have to be investigated before treatment is decided upon.

Thyroiditis is simply inflammation of the thyroid. It has several different causes and forms. As a result, there are also a number of different treatments and expectations for thyroiditis. It could resolve easily and without complication or the opposite. The thyroid is located at the front of the neck, but thyroiditis symptoms may not be limited to this area. That is because the thyroid is part of the endocrine system. When caused by another thyroid condition or when serious, thyroiditis can affect the body in various ways.

Thyroiditis can be caused by infections and viral illnesses. It can also be found in people with immune and autoimmune disorders. Certain women may experience thyroiditis after giving birth. Some medications are also known to cause thyroiditis. There are instances when there is no detectable underlying cause for thyroiditis. Anyone can develop this condition without warning. Thyroiditis may result in hypothyroidism, even long after the inflammation is cleared up, sometimes years after.  

In some cases, thyroiditis does not present with pain. In other cases, there is pain and noticeable swelling around the thyroid gland. The gland may swell and/or hurt on one or both sides. In painful cases, the pain can radiate up to the mouth and ears. Other symptoms include excessive sweating, difficulty swallowing, tachycardia, fatigue, bradycardia, dry skin, cold skin, lack of appetite, constipation and low grade fever.

Treatment of thyroiditis typically means combating the inflammation and the thyroid malfunctions that can arise. This means hormone therapy and anti-inflammatory medication. Fevers, heart rate changes and pain may also be treated. Sometimes surgery is indicated, but that is not the norm. Medical marijuana research indicates that it can treat inflammation, lack of appetite and pain. There is some risk involving patients with rapid heart rates, as marijuana can increase one's heart rate. Only a doctor can decide what type of medical marijuana is the safest for an individual thyroiditis sufferer. The cause, symptoms and complications will have to be investigated before treatment is decided upon.

Medical Marijuana and Thyroiditis

Thyroiditis, Weight Loss and Medical Marijuana 

Patients with thyroiditis may lose up to 10 pounds. Medical marijuana can stimulate appetite and instigate weight gain. This is one of the best-supported effects of medical marijuana in the marijuana literature. It is long established and even supported by the FDA. A drug called Marinol was approved by the FDA in 1986 as a medication for weight loss associated with AIDS. The drug also combats nausea and vomiting in chemotherapy patients. Marinol is synthetic THC. Given the number of studies that support the use of medical marijuana as an appetite stimulant, the approval of Marinol by the FDA in a political climate that demonizes marijuana use and the results seen in countless patients, there is no doubt that marijuana can stimulate appetite. However, the FDA only supports Marinol for the abovementioned conditions. Individuals with thyroiditis can only get medical marijuana in states where it is approved for thyroiditis. Both synthetic and natural THC work. 

Thyroiditis, Pain and Medical Marijuana 

Because medical marijuana is often given to cancer and AIDS patients -- two conditions that are notorious for being excruciating -- there is a lot of opportunity to observe its pain-relieving effects. In some cases, it works as well as established pain-relievers like codeine. In other cases, it does not work or makes pain worse. That is because THC can actually increase pain if too much is ingested. The pain relieving effects can take around 45 minutes to appear. Therefore, thyroiditis sufferers should establish a good dose before using medical marijuana to relieve pain, lest they increase their pain. It should be mentioned that other established pain relievers can have the same pain intensifying effects. 

Thyroiditis, Inflammation and Medical Marijuana 

Relatively new and limited research is showing that cannabinoids may play a role in reducing inflammation. Currently, Chron's disease is the center of attention in this regard. However, endocannabinoid receptors are found throughout the body. If they can reduce inflammation in one area, they can likely reduce it in others. Furthermore, anecdotal evidence supports medical marijuana use for inflammation caused by eczema and other skin rashes, further showing that medical marijuana can reduce inflammation.

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